Adventures In Audio
Spectrasonics Releases First Four S.A.G.E Xpanders for Stylus RMX

Press Desk

Our Press Desk collects press releases from audio manufacters, software developers, and instrument manufacturers and distributors. All content is created by the original company or their PR representives and is only lightly edited for clarity where necessary.

Thursday January 1, 2004
FREE EBOOK DOWNLOAD ►

December 20, 2004

Spectrasonics has now released a series of four new expansion libraries called "S.A.G.E. Xpanders" to enhance the variety of choices for their recently released Stylus RMX virtual groove instrument. The four Groove Control activated Xpanders are based on the company's Backbeat, Retro Funk, Liquid Grooves, and Metamorphosis collections. A fifth library, Burning Grooves is due to be released in January 2005.

Each Xpander comes on a DVD-ROM and is priced at $99US. The new Xpander libraries are easily added to Stylus RMX's already massive core library.

Spectrasonics' number one user request from their previous Classic Stylus virtual instrument was for more acoustic grooves. With Stylus RMX and the S.A.G.E. Xpanders, users can add literally thousands of acoustic drum and percussion grooves from BackBeat, Retro Funk Liquid, Grooves and Burning Grooves.

Each new Spectrasonics S.A.G.E. Xpander has a special bonus section which has hundreds of grooves from Spectrasonics' Vocal Planet, Bizarre Guitar and Distorted Reality sound libraries. Every Xpander also includes a unique set of creative Stylus RMX Multi patches that take advantage of the incredible S.A.G.E. (Spectrasonics Advanced Groove Engine) features of Stylus RMX and show the potential of Xpanders when used in combinations with the RMX Core Library and the Bonus section.

The grooves on these Xpanders were produced by Spectrasonics' Founder and Creative Director Eric Persing and feature numerous top session drummers including Abe Laboriel Jr., Gregg Bissonette, Bob Wilson, Eric Boseman and John Ferraro. They were recorded by Grammy-winning engineers at multiple legendary studiosincluding the Enterprise, O'Henry's, Music Grinder and Capitol Records.

Persing's signature sound design is evident throughout the series, most notably on his Metamorphosis Xpander, which features a wide range of floating, atmospheric Trip Hop pulsations, experimental euro-club beats, and intense Drum 'N Bass fury - designed specifically for creative film composers, producers and remixers.

"Grooves and sounds are a highly personal matter," said Persing. "Every musician has different tastes and interests in what kinds of source grooves they need to work with to fully realize their musical ideas. We've opened up the architecture of Stylus RMX to allow our users to expand into different styles, tones and genres such as acoustic drums. The new Xpander series immediately offers a vast array of choices to work with in the powerful S.A.G.E. technology. It's exciting because these grooves really come to life with features like the Chaos Designer!"

BackBeat, Liquid Grooves, Retro Funk and Metamorphosis Xpanders are now available through Spectrasonics' international dealers, The Burning Grooves Xpander will be shipping in January 2005. Each SAGE Xpander is $99US suggested retail price.

For more information, visit their web site at www.spectrasonics.net

Come on the Audio Masterclass Pro Home Studio MiniCourse - 60 great hints and tips to get your home recording studio MOVING

It's FREE!

Get It Now >>

How to choose the best key for your song

What is comb filtering? What does it sound like?

NEW: Audio crossfades come to Final Cut Pro X 10.4.9!

What is the difference between EQ and filters? *With Audio*

What difference will a preamp make to your recording?

Watch our video on linear phase filters and frequency response with the FabFilter Pro Q 2

Read our post on linear phase filters and frequency response with the Fabfilter Pro Q 2

Harmonic distortion with the Soundtoys Decapitator

What's the best height for studio monitors? Answer - Not too low!

What is the Red Book standard? Do I need to use it? Why?

Will floating point change the way we record?

Mixing: What is the 'Pedalboard Exception'?

The difference between mic level and line level

The problem with parallel compression that you didn't know you had. What it sounds like and how to fix it.

Compressing a snare drum to even out the level

What does parallel compression on vocals sound like?

How to automate tracks that have parallel compression

Why mono is better than stereo for recording vocals and dialogue

Clipping and compressing a drum recording to achieve an exciting sound texture

What can we learn about room acoustics from this image?

Can you hear the subtle effect of the knee control of the compressor? (With audio and video demonstrations)

What is the best studio microphone?

What is the Neve sound? (Using the Slate Digital FG-73)

What is the difference between recording, mixing and mastering?