Adventures In Audio
Celestion introduces the new V-Type impulse responses

Press Desk

Our Press Desk collects press releases from audio manufacters, software developers, and instrument manufacturers and distributors. All content is created by the original company or their PR representives and is only lightly edited for clarity where necessary.

Monday June 25, 2018
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Celestion, the premier manufacturer of guitar and bass loudspeakers with a celebrated history in creating the world’s renowned classic guitar tones, is pleased to debut the V-Type IR as the latest addition to their acclaimed line of Impulse Responses, the definitive digital representations of the company’s renowned classic tones. One of the company’s newest guitar speakers, the V-Type is sweet-sounding with a superbly balanced character that imparts a real vintage musicality; built with the modern player in mind. The new V-Type IR, as well as the rest of the collection of genuine Celestion IRs, are available for audition and download at CelestionPlus.

The new V-Type has a vintage pedigree, combining elements of the company’s most classic speakers, particularly the G12H Creamback and the G12M Greenback, to deliver well balanced tone right across the frequency range. The V-Type offers an alternative tonal flavour and a warm tactile feel.  Highs are open and airy, but never shrill or brittle; complemented by full-bodied lows and a well-balanced midrange. The speaker’s distinctive percussiveness is sure to bring joy to rhythm players, with a lower midrange that gets agreeably punchy when played dirty. Clean sounds sparkle and glimmer, but there’s still plenty of raunch on tap when it’s time to rock out.

The V-Type offers open and airy highs, chime and sparkle in the upper mids, a warm, well rounded mid-range and punchy lows, making it a great choice for a range of playing styles and rock genres. Now it’s easy to experience the modern vintage tones of the Celestion V-Type at home, in the studio or live, by downloading the new V-Type IR. Great on its own, or mixed with another speaker from Celestion’s range of IRs, the V-Type IR is a perfect place to start as a first addition to a Celestion IR collection, as well as an exciting addition to an existing collection.

Five individual IR varieties of the V-Type are available for download, which correspond to each of 5 separate types of cabinet, including: 1×12 (open back), 1×12 (closed back), 2×12 (open back), 2×12 (closed back) and 4×12 (closed back.) These can be purchased either separately, as an entire collection for a savings of over 40%, or as part of a Pick & Mix option. Celestion’s Pick & Mix option features IR combinations of either 3 or 5 cabinets from the company’s full range of IRs, offering customers flexibility and value pricing in building their personal IR library.

“Celestion is pleased to continue to add to the extended family of Impulse Responses with the introduction of the V-Type IR,” says Nigel Wood, Celestion CEO. “As a modern speaker with a vintage heritage, the V-Type is a great addition to any IR collection.”

The new V-Type IR joins the ever-growing family of authentic Celestion Impulse Responses which are available for purchase on Celestion Plus,  including the G12T-75 IR,  G12-50GL Lynchback, Classic Lead 80, Classic Gold, A-Type , Neo Creamback,  G12-H150 Redback,  G12M Greenback, G12M-65 Creamback, G12M-75 Creamback, G12H Anniversary, G12-65,  Cream, G12-35XC, Celestion Blue and Vintage 30 models. Find out more at CelestionPlus.

About Celestion Impulse Responses

Celestion IRs, which capture the essential behavior of the cabinet in the specific space in which it was recorded, including the frequency and phase response of single drivers as well as the interaction of multiple speakers, offer the user significant benefits. In both recording and live production, Celestion IRs enable the desired tone to be precisely and consistently reproduced regardless of the music recording or live sound environment. And IR users can escape the limitations of a single mic and cabinet setup and explore a universe of possibilities to create the perfect tone. Once you find a tone that you love, it can be precisely recreated, in the studio or on the road, time after time. And the IRs allow Celestion customers to audition specific models before purchasing one or more physical speakers.

Celestion IR digital downloads are available in uncompressed, industry standard .WAV format at 44.1 kHz, 48 kHz, 88.2 kHz and 96 kHz sample rates at 24 bit depth, in lengths of 200 and 500 milliseconds Once the files are downloaded and unzipped, users simply load the IRs into a convolution plug-in in their DAW or into other processing hardware. These formats will work in all known hardware capable of loading IRs, and for the most popular hardware Celestion have already grouped together the correct formats. Guitar processor manufacturers supported include Atomic Amps, Fractal Audio Systems, Kemper, Line 6, Logidy, Positive Grid, Two Notes, Headrush and Yamaha. The Celestion IR files may be downloaded in the sample rate and length appropriate for the hardware being used or as a complete package of all rates and lengths. Certain third party hardware requires the files to be converted into a proprietary format before use.

About Celestion and Celestion Guitar Speakers

An important element to essential British guitar tone since the birth of Rock & Roll, Celestion Guitar Speakers are famous for their lively and vocal midrange character with plenty of sparkle and chime. With worldwide headquarters in Ipswich, England, Celestion design, develop and manufacture premium guitar and bass loudspeakers, and high-quality professional audio drivers for sound reinforcement. These world-renowned speakers are used onstage and in clubs, theatres and other venues the world over. Contact Celestion at: info@celestion.com and visit us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/celestion.
www.celestion.com

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